Genoa

From Carsonpedia

Genoa is a town on the west side of the Carson Valley snuggled up against the Sierra foothills. It was founded in 1850, making it the first settlement in what is now called Nevada. The population of Genoa as of 2006 is 252 [1].

Genoa was first settled by Mormons from Utah, creating a fort on the Carson River Route called Mormon Station. The original Mormon traders sold their fort in 1854 to a rancher. The town was the home to Nevada's first hotel, newspaper and court. Nevada's first newspaper, the Territorial Enterprise, was founded in Genoa in 1858, but moved to Virginia City in 1860. Another first for the state, the Genoa Bar, billed "Nevada's oldest thirst parlor", was patronized by Mark Twain, Teddy Roosevelt and Johnny Cash and was used in John Wayne and Clint Eastwood films.

Much of Genoa, including the original fort, station and hotel was destroyed in a fire in 1910, but replica of the fort was built in 1947. Every year since 1919 Genoa has held a festival called The Candy Dance, where candy, food and crafts are sold to support its town government. The Candy Dance is usually held during the final weekend of September. Many pioneers rest in the Genoa graveyard including Snowshoe Thompson, his wife and his son.

A mile south of Genoa is David Walley's Resort, a famous natural hot springs and spa, first built in 1863.

Genoa, Nevada, unlike the city of Genoa, Italy, is pronounced with the accent on the second syllable: ge-NO-a.

External links

Credits

Some text excerpted from Wikipedia's Genoa page.